Salim Mansur awarded for efforts to promote interfaith understanding

December 04, 2017

Salim Mansur, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, was awarded a Senate 150th Anniversary Medal for his work to promote interfaith understanding.

Associate Professor Salim Mansur (centre) receiving the Canada Senate 150th Anniversary medal from the Speaker of the House, the Hon. George J. Furey, QC, and flanked by Senator Linda Frum. 

Salim Mansur, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, was awarded a Senate 150th Anniversary Medal for his work to promote interfaith understanding.

The award ceremony took place in the Senate Chamber, Parliament of Canada, on November 29 and was presided by the Honourable George J. Furey, Speaker of the Senate.

The award citation for Mansur noted, “Salim Mansur has done extensive work promoting interfaith understanding, particularly Jewish-Muslim reconciliation. An author, columnist and professor at Western University, he is a founding member of the board of directors for the Centre for Islamic Pluralism based in Washington, D.C.”

Mansur researches international and comparative politics with a focus on South Asia and the Middle East. He also speaks widely on interfaith relations. Mansur had a syndicated column in Sun Media newspapers, and has spoken widely on the topic of interfaith relations, including appearing as a witness in parliamentary committee hearings in Ottawa.

“There are a few Muslim voices in Canada taking leadership in this arena of interfaith communication,” said Mansur, “and I was identified among those involved. Until and unless we can reconcile Jew-Muslim relationship as people sharing common religious values, the conflict between Muslim countries and Israel will fester, and the Muslim world will continue to regress in terms of freedom and democracy.”

The Senate 150th Anniversary Medal is intended to celebrate the achievements of Canadians who have made significant contributions to their community and commemorates the 150th anniversary of the first sitting of the Senate on November 6, 1867.

“Through the creation of this medal, senators sought to honour Canadians whose generosity, dedication, volunteerism and selfless service have meant so much, to so many,” a Senate statement explained. “On this day, senators have the privilege of recognizing those people who embody the values that bind us together and make Canada a caring and compassionate country."